Gliding

Gliding

Gliding is a recreational activity and competitive air sports in which pilots fly unpowered aircraft known as gliders or sailplanes using naturally currents of vising air in the atmosphere to remain airborne.

 

Aircrafts in use:

There are several types and categories of the aircrafts in use, based on aircraft weight, number of persons on board, flight pattern and whether it is with or without engine. There are four types:

  1. Free Gliding (Paragliding-PG)

Gliding is a recreational activity and competitive air sports in which pilots fly unpowered aircraft known as gliders or sailplanes using naturally currents of rising air in the atmosphere to remain air borne.

 

  1. Gliding with engine- (Para motor)

Para motor is a generic name for the propulsive portion of a powered paraglider (ppa). It consists of frame that combines the motor, propeller, harness (with in tegrated seat) and cage. It provides tow attachment points for the risers of paraglider wing that allows for powered flight.

 

  1. Gliding with engine: (Power Parachute -PPC)

A powered parachute often abbreviated (ppc) and also called motorized parachute or Para plane is a type of ultra-light aircraft that consist of a parachute with a motor and wheels. There is two type one seat and tow seat, airspeed is typically about 25-35 mph (10,000) feet (5-skm).

  1. Gliding with Delta plane (ultra-light trike)

An ultra-light is type of powered hang glider where flight control is by weight shift. These aircraft have a fabric flex wing (delta shape) which is suspended a tricycle fuselage pod driven by pusher propeller. The pod accommodates either a solo pilot, or pilot and   a single passenger. Trikes grant affordable, accessible and exciting flying, and have been popular since the 1980s.

Tikes are referred to as micro lights. Such aircraft are also known as, 2-axis micro lights, flex –wing trikes, weight-shift control aircraft, micro light trikes, delta trikes, or motorized delta planes.